ABOUT TABLES SEATING STORAGE LIGHTING CUSTOM BEDS NEWS

SAWKILLE Co. is a small furniture company in the Catskills. We have been making hand built furniture for the past 18 years. In 2010 we became Sawkille Co. opening our headquarters and showroom in Rhinebeck, NY. We draw from the heritage of the Hudson Valley; from people creating and working to build a life around what is meaningful to them. We have been thankful ever since to have the courage to pursue this, because we love what we do.



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Truro, MA.

Truro, MA.

Truro, MA.
Well gaurded.

Truro, MA.

Well gaurded.

Athens atmosphere.

Athens atmosphere.

Late summer afternoon.

Late summer afternoon.

Small boy’s wonderland.

Small boy’s wonderland.

All is well. And I thank my lucky stars and bow to the abundance of the universe. Woo weeee.

All is well. And I thank my lucky stars and bow to the abundance of the universe. Woo weeee.

As I garner confidence and drive to pursue the third year of “home-schooling” our daughter, I have found grounded inspiration in the experience of Astra Taylor ( quote and link below). It is an issue of trust and believing in the capacity to provide a rich, meaningful experience, trust in the human nature that drives us to explore, learn and grow. I witness the internal power of both of our children all the time and yet I find myself questioning, whether they will develop, “be smart”, be driven, harness the power to live a life that is meaningful and deeply satisfying to themselves, without going through a conventional schooling. I am pushing towards what feels great, towards the energy that comes with true excitement and interest and not to simply push away from what I found so lacking in my own educational experience.   As I listen to Ms. Taylor  it reinforces in a thoughtful and bold way that there is far more to our human experience than we explore in most educational settings and that those settings and constructs may even work against the essence of what I would most hope children would be supported in experiencing.  

"our parents weren’t trying to limit our exposure to worldly activities with their potentially corrupting points of view. Instead, we always said the world was our classroom. In theory at least, nothing was off-limits.
We differed from homeschoolers in essential ways. We weren’t replicating school at home. We had no textbooks, class times, deadlines, tests, or curricula. Were we fascinated by primates? By rocks? By baseball cards or balloon animals? If so, it was our duty to investigate. My parents eschewed coercion and counted on our curiosity, which they understood to be a most basic human capacity. This is really what the whole debate over compulsory schooling is about. Do we trust people’s capacity to be curious or not?” 
- Astra Taylor
 The Unschooled Life: Astra Taylor’s Story
http://www.popularresistance.org/the-unschooled-life-astra-taylor-story/

As I garner confidence and drive to pursue the third year of “home-schooling” our daughter, I have found grounded inspiration in the experience of Astra Taylor ( quote and link below). It is an issue of trust and believing in the capacity to provide a rich, meaningful experience, trust in the human nature that drives us to explore, learn and grow. I witness the internal power of both of our children all the time and yet I find myself questioning, whether they will develop, “be smart”, be driven, harness the power to live a life that is meaningful and deeply satisfying to themselves, without going through a conventional schooling. I am pushing towards what feels great, towards the energy that comes with true excitement and interest and not to simply push away from what I found so lacking in my own educational experience.   As I listen to Ms. Taylor  it reinforces in a thoughtful and bold way that there is far more to our human experience than we explore in most educational settings and that those settings and constructs may even work against the essence of what I would most hope children would be supported in experiencing.  

"our parents weren’t trying to limit our exposure to worldly activities with their potentially corrupting points of view. Instead, we always said the world was our classroom. In theory at least, nothing was off-limits.

We differed from homeschoolers in essential ways. We weren’t replicating school at home. We had no textbooks, class times, deadlines, tests, or curricula. Were we fascinated by primates? By rocks? By baseball cards or balloon animals? If so, it was our duty to investigate. My parents eschewed coercion and counted on our curiosity, which they understood to be a most basic human capacity. This is really what the whole debate over compulsory schooling is about. Do we trust people’s capacity to be curious or not?” 

- Astra Taylor

 The Unschooled Life: Astra Taylor’s Story

http://www.popularresistance.org/the-unschooled-life-astra-taylor-story/

Millstream Bed. 

Millstream Bed. 

Summer time.

Summer time.

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